JEWISH IN THE 21ST CENTURY

January 31-February 2, 2020
Southern California

FRIDAY PROGRAM FREE
$15 per session on Saturday and Sunday
or $35 for entire weekend


 

Change is the oldest Jewish tradition. The 21st Century has transformed what it means to be Jewish, to “do Jewish,” and to be part of the Jewish people. What will these changes mean for the Jewish future?

Rabbi Adam Chalom Ph.D., Dean – North America
International Institute for Secular Humanistic Judaism


 

Friday, Jan. 31
Shabbat Celebration
and Opening Session

7:30 pm-9:00 pm
Borders and Boundaries:
Staying Jewish,
Becoming Jewish,
and Being “Jewish AND”

What are the boundaries of Jewishness? Can one stop being Jewish? If being Jewish is, for many, a cultural and ethnic identity, can one become Jewish? And what does it mean to be “Jewish AND” rather than “Jewish OR”?

Hosted by Pacific Community of Cultural Jews, Orange County (location TBD)

Saturday, Feb. 1
Being Jewish
and Doing Jewish

9:00am-Noon
Being Jewish:
What is a Jew?

What do secular Jews in Southern California have in common with Hasidim in Brooklyn or Israelis in Tel Aviv or the West Bank? Are the Jews a race, or a people, or a tribe, or an ethnicity, or a philosophy, or a religion, or a culture? And do we have enough in common to be ONE people?

1:30pm-4:30pm
Doing Jewish:
Not Just for Jews Anymore!

What counts as “doing Jewish”? For many, the word “mitzvah” is more meaningful as “good deed” than “divine commandment.” Defining unique “Jewish values” can be challenging, especially when modern values disagree with Jewish tradition. How can focusing on “doing Jewish” create more open and inclusive Jewish community?

Hosted by Kahal Am, San Diego (location TBD)

Sunday, Feb. 2
Living Jewish

 

9:30am-Noon
Living Jewish:
Intersection of Being & Doing

What are the most important lessons from the concepts of being Jewish and doing Jewish? Why are we motivated to stay Jewish and pass it on? What in our daily, seasonal and ethical lives can be motivated by Jewish identity and practice? And how do we harmonize our Jewishness with our many personal identities?

Hosted by Adat Chaverim Congregation for Humanistic Judaism, Los Angeles (at Tarzana Community and Cultural Center, 19130 Ventura Boulevard)